The substitution series


The substitution series was issued on 23 July 1945. In deep secrecy, without the German occupation forces finding out what was going on, a banknote series was printed in cooperation with book printers Egmont H. Petersen. The year on the banknotes was 1944. The 5- and 10-krone banknotes were newly designed and the brown 10-krone banknote was printed with this year only. Subsequently, it was changed in 1945 and 1947 so that it had the same face as the 50-, 100- and 500-krone banknotes with the face from the previous Heilmann series.

5-krone banknote

Format 129 x 72 mm.

The 5-krone banknote was issued on 23 July 1945 and has been withdrawn since 1 July 1953.
The motif on the face of the banknote is inspired by Art Nouveau and consists of interwoven figures of five.
The reverse consists of a base of three light grey guilloched rosettes with three slightly smaller blue guilloched rosettes on top. The word guilloche is French and is used to describe the machine-engraved geometrical ornaments which were part of the graphic security features of the banknote.

10-krone banknote

Format 131 x 80 mm.

The 10-krone banknote was issued on 23 july 1945 and has been withdrawn since 1 July 1953.

 

Format 130 x 80 mm.

The 10-krone banknote was issued on 22 May 1947 and has been withdrawn since 1 July 1953.
The Art Nouveau face of the banknote has a border of seaweed. In the middle is a faint pattern of seagrass, snail shells and seashells. The face of the banknote was designed by the painter and illustrator Gerhard Heilmann (1859-1946).
The reverse consists of a base of three light green guilloched rosettes with slightly smaller black guilloched rosettes on top. The word guilloche is French and is used to describe the machine-engraved geometrical ornaments which were part of the graphic security features of the banknote.
The small coat of arms is displayed in the middle. It consists of three lions and nine hearts under one crown. The three crowned lions have been used by Danish kings for the last 800 years. In the 16th century the number of hearts was set at nine. The hearts may not be hearts at all, but heraldic lily leaves (floating hearts), which in turn may be derived from linden leaves.

50-krone banknote

Format 156 x 100 mm.

The 50-krone banknote was issued on 24 July 1945 and has been withdrawn since 21 May 1957.
The motif on the face of the banknote is a boat with three fishermen drawing in their nets. The motif is bordered by hopbines with fruits in Art Nouveau style. There are also faint patterns of a field of flowers (bottom) and leaves (top). The face of the banknote was designed by the painter and illustrator Gerhard Heilmann (1859-1946).
The reverse consists of a base of three greyish-green guilloched rosettes with three slightly smaller violet guilloched rosettes on top. The word guilloche is French and is used to describe the machine-engraved geometrical ornaments which were part of the graphic security features of the banknote.
The small coat of arms is displayed in the middle. It consists of three lions and nine hearts under one crown. The three crowned lions have been used by Danish kings for the last 800 years. In the 16th century the number of hearts was set at nine. The hearts may not be hearts at all, but heraldic lily leaves (floating hearts), which in turn may be derived from linden leaves.

100-krone banknote

Format 156 x 100 mm.

The 100-krone banknote was issued on 23 July 1945 and has been withdrawn since 3 May 1962.
The Art Nouveau face of the banknote has a seaweed decoration in the middle, bordered by interwoven dolphins. The face of the banknote was designed by the painter and illustrator Gerhard Heilmann (1859-1946).
The reverse consists of a base of three dark green guilloched rosettes with three slightly smaller black guilloched rosettes on top. The word guilloche is French and is used to describe the machine-engraved geometrical ornaments which were part of the graphic security features of the banknote.
The small coat of arms is displayed in the middle. It consists of three lions and nine hearts under one crown. The three crowned lions have been used by Danish kings for the last 800 years. In the 16th century the number of hearts was set at nine. The hearts may not be hearts at all, but heraldic lily leaves (floating hearts), which in turn may be derived from linden leaves.

500-krone banknote

Format 174 x 108 mm.

The 500-krone banknote was issued on 23 July 1945 and has been withdrawn since 2 April 1964.
In the middle of the banknote is a scene with a farmer walking behind a horse-drawn plough with seagulls and forest in the background. The motif is bordered by Art Nouveau leaves. There is also a faint pattern of buttercups, narcissi and iris. The face of the banknote was designed by the painter and illustrator Gerhard Heilmann (1859-1946).
The reverse consists of a base of three brown guilloched rosettes with three slightly smaller black guilloched rosettes on top. The word guilloche is French and is used to describe the machine-engraved geometrical ornaments which were part of the graphic security features of the banknote.
The small coat of arms is displayed in the middle. It consists of three lions and nine hearts under one crown. The three crowned lions have been used by Danish kings for the last 800 years. In the 16th century the number of hearts was set at nine. The hearts may not be hearts at all, but heraldic lily leaves (floating hearts), which in turn may be derived from linden leaves.