Research

In 2016, Danmarks Nationalbank established a new, independent Research Unit, to support the policy decisions of Danmarks Nationalbank by providing a conceptual framework to assess policy-making challenges, and economic models and tools to analyse the economy. Economists in the Research Unit are expected to produce high-quality research to be published in refereed journals and to participate in the international academic and central banking debate. The Research Unit runs the Danmarks Nationalbank PhD Program, and is part of the Economics and Monetary Policy Department. Economists throughout all core departments at Danmarks Nationalbank conduct research in a wide variety of areas in Macroeconomics and Finance.

The Economists: The Research Unit is led by Federico Ravenna. A full list of economists currently engaged in research at Danmarks Nationalbank is available here.

The CopenhagenMacro Network: Danmarks Nationalbank hosts the CopenhagenMacro network of economists. The CopenhagenMacro calendar lists research events held at institutions in the Copenhagen area.

Ph.D. Student Program: If you would like to know more or apply, additional information is available here.

Published Download Title
30-11-2021

Working Paper: Firm financing and public support measures during the pandemic

This paper studies Danish firms' debt financing decisions during covid-19 with a focus on the impact of government support measures. Credit growth has been modest during the pandemic. Public liquidity measures such as deferred tax and VAT payments served as a substitute for more traditional debt funding sources.

02-11-2021

Working Paper: Measuring household interest-rate sensitivity in Denmark

We evaluate homeowners’ interest-rate sensitivity on cash flows and balance sheets of a 1 percentage point increase in interest rates. Overall, the interest-rate sensitivity is limited. However, for a subgroup of homeowners, an increase in interest rates will have a substantial effect on their cash flows and balance sheets.

27-10-2021

Working Paper: Corporate Investment and Cash Holdings under Financing Shocks

I analyze to which extent corporate cash holdings protect firms from the adverse consequences of shocks to their borrowing costs. Despite firms self-insuring against spikes in their borrowing costs by holding cash, an aggregate shock to borrowing conditions similar to that seen during the Global Financial Crisis can significantly contract aggregate investment, especially for firms with low cash holdings.

08-09-2021

Working Paper: Government spending and retail prices: Regional evidence from the United States

In this Working Paper, I study the effects of local government spending on local retail prices using retail scanner data from the United States. Estimates show that retail prices increase following an increase in government spending. I provide evidence which indicates that this cannot be accounted for by changes in marginal costs.

28-06-2021

Working Paper: Securitization and House Price Growth

From 2000-2006 US house prices and mortgage credit grew while the relative cost of mortgage credit fell particularly for privately securitized mortgages suggesting a credit supply expansion. This paper explores two (credit supply) shocks: an increased inflow of global savings into the US, and innovations in the securitization of mortgage credit. Only innovation in securitization matches mortgage market dynamics.

28-06-2021

Working Paper: The Portfolio Balance Channel of Quantitative Easing in a DSGE Model with Financial Frictions

Investors who arbitrage between long term government debt and corporate debt expand the Portfolio Balance Channel in that the effects of Quantitative Easing (QE) spill over to the overall cost of corporate borrowing. I find that overall the Federal Reserve’s second round of QE boosts output between 0.5 - 1.7%.

25-06-2021

Working Paper: Female business owners pay higher interest rates on corporate loans

Female owners of small and medium-sized enterprises, on average, pay almost 1 percent higher interest rates than male owners. Firm and loan characteristics explain most of this difference. Nonetheless, a 26 basis point gap cannot be explained, suggesting that female business owners tend to leave a disproportionate share of money on the table during negotiations with credit institutions.

News from Research

15 February 2021
Dataset: Climate Risk Factors from "Are Climate Change Risks Priced in the U.S. Stock Market?", Faccini, Matin and Skiadopoulos. Danmarks Nationalbank Working Paper, February 2021, No. 169.

climate_time_series.xlsx